Find the Skipjack

Find the Skipjack

My mother’s family is from the Eastern Shore of Maryland and Virginia, a peninsula situated between Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean that is environmentally, historically, and culturally distinct and diverse. As a child and young adult, before my museum career resulted in moves away from the Mid-Atlantic, I would spend significant time on the shore, and increasingly I came to realize the depth of my love for this amazing place.

There is White Water Ahead

There is White Water Ahead

In keeping with the idea of the Horizon Report, Tim Grove offers ten suggestions for history organizations struggling with adopting technology.

“Can we use objects from the past and present to envision our future?”

“Can we use objects from the past and present to envision our future?”

In her Summer 2011 article in History News Rainey Tisdale asks, “Do History Museums Still Need Objects?“. Lynne Ireland responds with a resounding “yes” but shares some corollary questions that fuel her institution’s strategic planning discussions as they address the very concrete challenges that surround this issue.

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“Are we here to serve the stuff or the people?”

“Are we here to serve the stuff or the people?”

In her Summer 2011 article in History News Rainey Tisdale asks, “Do History Museums Still Need Objects?“. David Crosson responds and suggests we are asking the wrong question and that the underlying issue is one of fundamental values, not one of resources or means.

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An Ideal World: A Tiered System for our Collections

An Ideal World: A Tiered System for our Collections

In her Summer 2011 article in History News Rainey Tisdale asks, “Do History Museums Still Need Objects?“. Trevor Jones reacts by describing his ideal world — one in which there would be a tiered system for our collections.

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“Wouldn’t it just make people feel?”

“Wouldn’t it just make people feel?”

In her Summer 2011 article in History News Rainey Tisdale asks, “Do History Museums Still Need Objects?“. Ron Potvin shares his gut reactions and ties his reflections to an exhibition he recently visited.

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Are Collections Old Bones or New Ideas?

Are Collections Old Bones or New Ideas?

In her Summer 2011 article in History News Rainey Tisdale asks, “Do History Museums Still Need Objects?“. Linda Norris offers a reply: “We absolutely still need objects—but we need to experiment more broadly, be less rigid, and encourage our communities to view our collections in new ways …”

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Do History Museums Still Need Objects?

Do History Museums Still Need Objects?

This piece considers seven major issues currently confronting history museums and historic sites as they seek to make their collections meaningful, relevant, and accessible for a general audience. Do history museums still need objects?

What do you think? Join the conversation!

Washington Slept Here? Upsetting the Narrative Apple Cart at Historic Sites

Washington Slept Here? Upsetting the Narrative Apple Cart at Historic Sites

In 2009, a group of students at Brown University undertook a project to revitalize and reinterpret the Governor Stephen Hopkins House in Providence, focusing on the untold story of enslaved. Is the methodology used during this project easily reproducible by other house museums? Is attracting new audiences worth the risk of alienating existing audiences?

What do you think? Join the conversation!

Can We Make Historic House Museums Sustainable?

Can We Make Historic House Museums Sustainable?

House museums are an important segment of the museum field, but they are increasingly in danger of being marginalized. What can we do to make sure that historic house museums are physically and financially sustainable beyond our generation?

Share your ideas and join the conversation!