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Find the Skipjack

Find the Skipjack

My mother’s family is from the Eastern Shore of Maryland and Virginia, a peninsula situated between Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean that is environmentally, historically, and culturally distinct and diverse. As a child and young adult, before my museum career resulted in moves away from the Mid-Atlantic, I would spend significant time on the shore, and increasingly I came to realize the depth of my love for this amazing place.

There is White Water Ahead

There is White Water Ahead

In keeping with the idea of the Horizon Report, Tim Grove offers ten suggestions for history organizations struggling with adopting technology.

Do History Museums Still Need Objects?

Do History Museums Still Need Objects?

This piece considers seven major issues currently confronting history museums and historic sites as they seek to make their collections meaningful, relevant, and accessible for a general audience. Do history museums still need objects?

What do you think? Join the conversation!

Washington Slept Here? Upsetting the Narrative Apple Cart at Historic Sites

Washington Slept Here? Upsetting the Narrative Apple Cart at Historic Sites

In 2009, a group of students at Brown University undertook a project to revitalize and reinterpret the Governor Stephen Hopkins House in Providence, focusing on the untold story of enslaved. Is the methodology used during this project easily reproducible by other house museums? Is attracting new audiences worth the risk of alienating existing audiences?

What do you think? Join the conversation!

Can We Make Historic House Museums Sustainable?

Can We Make Historic House Museums Sustainable?

House museums are an important segment of the museum field, but they are increasingly in danger of being marginalized. What can we do to make sure that historic house museums are physically and financially sustainable beyond our generation?

Share your ideas and join the conversation!

Transforming Young Minds with the Magic of History: National History Day Program Proves Innovative History Education Works

Transforming Young Minds with the Magic of History: National History Day Program Proves Innovative History Education Works

At a time when social studies is losing ground in American schools and the importance of studying history in a democracy is being ignored, National History Day (NHD) launched a national study of the effects of learning history through historical research.

Learn about the key findings and explore the implications for your institution. Join the conversation!

How Collection Planning and Collaboration Supports the Cultural Heritage Institution and Community Memory

How Collection Planning and Collaboration Supports the Cultural Heritage Institution and Community Memory

The “Documentation Strategy” enables institutions to systematically gather and maintain materials that are vital to the story of civilization. It has been used by some archivists as a tool to support collection planning for the past three decades.

How does your institution work to support the documentary record? Is collaborative collection development across cultural disciplines a good idea for your institution and community? Join the conversation!

Crowdsourcing: Harnessing the Knowledge of Crowds

Crowdsourcing: Harnessing the Knowledge of Crowds

“Crowdsourcing” is loosely defined as mining the collective knowledge of a group. The term is often linked with online communities. Since there are never enough resources to accomplish the research projects that most history organizations hope to complete, crowdsourcing offers one strategy to address the challenge.

Is your institution “crowdsourcing”? Join the conversation!

Grappling with the Concept of Radical Trust

Grappling with the Concept of Radical Trust

People have more platforms than ever before to share their opinions with a wider world and an increased expectation that they should be included in the dialogue. Allowing your users to contribute content to your website requires radical trust. This concept, gaining steam with the rise of Web 2.0 and the popularity of social media tools like Flickr, Facebook, Youtube, blogs, and Twitter naturally raises concern in history organizations. It threatens authoritative voice and weakens control. Yet, it offers opportunities to reach and engage new audiences.

What do you think of this notion of “radical trust”?