Archive | History Bytes RSS feed for this section
Find the Skipjack

Find the Skipjack

My mother’s family is from the Eastern Shore of Maryland and Virginia, a peninsula situated between Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean that is environmentally, historically, and culturally distinct and diverse. As a child and young adult, before my museum career resulted in moves away from the Mid-Atlantic, I would spend significant time on the shore, and increasingly I came to realize the depth of my love for this amazing place.

There is White Water Ahead

There is White Water Ahead

In keeping with the idea of the Horizon Report, Tim Grove offers ten suggestions for history organizations struggling with adopting technology.

Crowdsourcing: Harnessing the Knowledge of Crowds

Crowdsourcing: Harnessing the Knowledge of Crowds

“Crowdsourcing” is loosely defined as mining the collective knowledge of a group. The term is often linked with online communities. Since there are never enough resources to accomplish the research projects that most history organizations hope to complete, crowdsourcing offers one strategy to address the challenge.

Is your institution “crowdsourcing”? Join the conversation!

Grappling with the Concept of Radical Trust

Grappling with the Concept of Radical Trust

People have more platforms than ever before to share their opinions with a wider world and an increased expectation that they should be included in the dialogue. Allowing your users to contribute content to your website requires radical trust. This concept, gaining steam with the rise of Web 2.0 and the popularity of social media tools like Flickr, Facebook, Youtube, blogs, and Twitter naturally raises concern in history organizations. It threatens authoritative voice and weakens control. Yet, it offers opportunities to reach and engage new audiences.

What do you think of this notion of “radical trust”?